Contents
  1. The New Jim Crow | Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness (Alexander)
  2. The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander (ebook)
  3. The New Jim Crow
  4. The New Jim Crow (Kobo eBook)

Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. Starred Review. Contrary to the rosy picture of race eBook features: Highlight, take notes, and search in the book. The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander. Read online. Once in a great while a book comes along that changes the way we see the world and helps to fuel a nationwide social movement. The New Jim Crow is such a.

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The New Jim Crow Ebook

This book seeks to analyze the issue of race in America after the election of Barack Obama. For the author, the U.S. criminal justice system functions can act as a. Chapter 3: The Color of Justice. Chapter 4: The Cruel Hand. Chapter 5: The New Jim Crow. Chapter 6: The Fire This Time. Read "The New Jim Crow" by Michelle Alexander available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first download. Once in a great while a book.

Once in a great while a book comes along that changes the way we see the world and helps to fuel a nationwide social movement. The New Jim Crow is such a book. Praised by Harvard Law professor Lani Guinier as "brave and bold," this book directly challenges the notion that the election of Barack Obama signals a new era of colorblindness. With dazzling candor, legal scholar Michelle Alexander argues that "we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it. Called "stunning" by Pulitzer Prize—winning historian David Levering Lewis, "invaluable" by the Daily Kos , "explosive" by Kirkus , and "profoundly necessary" by the Miami Herald , this updated and revised paperback edition of The New Jim Crow , now with a foreword by Cornel West, is a must-read for all people of conscience. Between the World and Me. Ta-Nehisi Coates. Listen, Liberal.

It is written persuasively more than how it claims to be about starting a discussion. I enjoyed it over all as the author has a strong voice and has adept writing skills. The New Jim Crow massively oversimplifies issues in the American criminal justice system. It is perplexing how this book has received the hype that it has. It essentially cries racism and blames every issue within the system on that single claim.

It is hard to take this work as an objective analysis of the criminal justice system when so many important aspects are ignored to advance the author's arguments.

Alexander seldom acknowledges the all too real damage that narcotics inflict upon communities and our society as a whole. She also omits examples of "real" failed drug wars that have taken place as close as central America.

The New Jim Crow | Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness (Alexander)

If the topics covered in this book interest you I really recommend reading other books because this one simply does not paint a very accurate nor complete picture of the subject matter. Below are a couple of recommendations. A War that Cant Be Won: Locked In: Exceptionally well-researched look at how mass incarceration in the U.

It's truthful, timely and in many ways prescriptive - it's one of those books that everyone should read. The author says it is meant to be a discussion starter.

The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander (ebook)

Her thesis is that there Jim Crow laws have been replaced with a racial caste system. Her husband a federal prosecutor, sees it differently. This book really isn't meant to be read by yourself. You need other opinions as you read it. If you are in a book club or even a progressive church Sunday School class, this would be a great discussion starter. My favorite Sunday School class was in a Salem Oregon Methodist church, , where we discussed what how did our actions now reflect our Christianity.

The New Jim Crow

Each class had a different focus, like responding to terrorism or working with Habitat for Humanity. I could see this book being used in that class or in an AP high school class. The New Jim Crow is an instant classic of the genre. Since publication, I have seen this book and its arguments cited in so much media I've consumed books, documentaries, podcasts. I am glad I finally got to experience the source text myself.

Once released, they find that a heavy and cruel hand has been laid upon them. Alexander argues that reductions in legal avenues provided to black prisoners; Supreme Court antagonism toward racial bias in cases; and more people of color getting taken up by law enforcement forces despite the fact that more white people commit drug crimes, leads to a situation in which mass incarceration does not serve to reduce crime but to induce racialized social control.

If you retain an ounce of social justice in your psyche, you will probably want to repeatedly throw this book across the room, but not because it is poorly written.

It is because it is so well researched and argued that it boggles the mind that this reader could have been so blind as not to see it. I wonder how well book could be countered.

The book is way to repetitive, but then glosses over some topics. Even so very interesting. New book with new information would be good. This is a very important book to read, and I'd recommend it for that reason.

I wanted it to say even more though. The book is repetitive, but then glosses over some topics. There could have been more about juveniles being charged as adults, jury selection, funding for public defenders, and the militarization of police departments. The book is only 8 years old, but already seems dated. I hope there is a second edition at some point that looks at how the Black Lives Matter movement, social media, police body cameras, and the Trump presidency have affected the rates of mass incarceration and public perception.

This book blew me away and helped me to better appreciate the racial challenges we are facing while educating me about important civil right's history I did not know.

Not only does author Michelle Alexander write with coherence and clarity, but she makes the material into a page turner, without exaggeration or hyperbole. The facts presented disturbingly connect the dots and substantiate her thesis that the war on drugs, in effect has created an underclass of Americans, who can be legally discriminated against in housing, employment, educational opportunities and exercise of basic citizenship rights that the rest of us take for granted.

It is perplexing how this book has received the hype that it has. It essentially cries racism and blames every issue within the system on that single claim.

It is hard to take this work as an objective analysis of the criminal justice system when so many important aspects are ignored to advance the author's arguments. Alexander seldom acknowledges the all too real damage that narcotics inflict upon communities and our society as a whole.

She also omits examples of "real" failed drug wars that have taken place as close as central America. If the topics covered in this book interest you I really recommend reading other books because this one simply does not paint a very accurate nor complete picture of the subject matter.

Below are a couple of recommendations.

It's truthful, timely and in many ways prescriptive - it's one of those books that everyone should read. Like b brangwinn Aug 22, The author says it is meant to be a discussion starter. Her thesis is that there Jim Crow laws have been replaced with a racial caste system. Her husband a federal prosecutor, sees it differently.

The New Jim Crow (Kobo eBook)

This book really isn't meant to be read by yourself. You need other opinions as you read it. If you are in a book club or even a progressive church Sunday School class, this would be a great discussion starter. My favorite Sunday School class was in a Salem Oregon Methodist church, , where we discussed what how did our actions now reflect our Christianity. Each class had a different focus, like responding to terrorism or working with Habitat for Humanity.

I could see this book being used in that class or in an AP high school class. Since publication, I have seen this book and its arguments cited in so much media I've consumed books, documentaries, podcasts.

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